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2003 Moto Guzzi Breva V 750 IE

2003 Moto Guzzi Breva V 750 IE

The guys from Mandello need a new type of buyer indeed. Dunno if you’ve noticed, but it’s already a few years that Moto-Guzzi’s offerings are centered around customs and cruisers/tourers. As lovely as those V11’s are, it’s the California 1100’s and Nevada 750’s that have been keeping Guzzi afloat. Alas, since the Aprilia takeover, Guzzi are starting to see black ink again in the balance sheets, and so time for a new effort in a different direction. Accordingly, the new 750 carries a symbolic name, Breva, which is the name of the wind that blows in spring over the Lago di Como, bringing in good weather.

Before swinging even half a leg over the Breva, my first reaction was like yeah, nice indeed. Extra tasty curves and details give the Breva a very up-to-date look that’s on the other hand quite classical too. The nod towards the classic scene is evident in the choice of metallic colors. It’s not hard to see that the efforts of the staff at Marabese Design—the studio that handled the styling—headed in a very different direction than the creators of the BMW CS650.

With its visually singular engine in full view and an erect riding position, the Breva is a true roadster, a do-it-all kind of ride with a pinch of sporty stance. Good to see that under the scrutinizing eyes of the design-conscious Aprilia management, no skimping or half measures were taken on details. Plenty of sculpted cast alloy brackets, a small smoked screen and Brembo Gold series brakes give the Breva an air of quality not usually found in entry-level bikes.

If that engine looks familiar it’s because as «new» as the Breva is, its engine is still based on the «small block» Guzzi twin from the late 70’s V50’s. It has received an ultra-serious revamp since its last incarnation as the power unit for the 750 Nevada, complete with full digital management of its new injection and ignition systems. A lambda probe gas sensor supplies real time feedback to the engine management for constant low emissions adjustment, and what’s left passes through catalytic converters. Guzzi’s engineers sought drivability from this engine, which explains how a 750 can be called a beginner’s tool. Claimed power is only 48 hp, which doesn’t make much sense until you understand that many European countries limit beginners to 50 hp until they’re 21 years old. It then makes more sense to fatten the torque curve rather than shoot for peak figures. In any case, the 750 Breva falls in line power-wise with the above mentioned models, only it supplies its torque peak at a meager 3600 rpm—something a high-revving 500 dohc twin can only dream of.

On the cycle side of things, the Breva is again, a mix of old and new. Frame seems familiar but attached to it are very nice pieces, stuff I would’ve killed for when I was a starving student with a Guzzi V50 III rat-bike held together with duct tape. Nice forks and a hefty single front disk, light looking cast wheels, braided brake hose, and yes! No linked brakes thank God! But then, I could have been even happier without those twin shocks. They’re simpler and more economical to be sure, but my back could be in better shape today if it wasn’t for those twin nasty Marzocchis of my old V50 (the Breva wears Bitubos).

Start the Breva and it settles immediately into that typical Guzzi rock and roll—shocking if you’re coming from an oriental ride but nothing special compared to a Beemer or a Sporty. The EFI and Lamabada thing have the engine pumping steady right from the word go, and a few twists of the throttle reveal a response that’s really quick and requires zero effort—no more heavy-sprung carb slides to lift here. Amazingly, clutch-pull effort has been reduced to made-in-Japan levels, no mean feat for a single-disc auto type clutch. The smooth and easy operation theme continues with sweet-shifting gears.

As it would turn out, this bike is all about sweetness and friendliness. After a few minutes of riding towards the mountains in front of Mandello del Lario shore with quite heavy traffic around, the Breva conveys a feeling of total ease of operation. It starts with a textbook standard riding position and very light and intuitive steering. Then, with peak torque coming on so early, the Breva shoots forward nicely with short throttle bursts. Just as well, the engine soon shows that although it’ll climb to almost 7K when given time, there isn’t too much point in taking it past 5.5K rpm. Trying to keep pace with the quick local Guzzi road testers that accompanied us journos for the ride, it soon become obvious that on this twisty mountain road the best trait of the Breva was its agility. A short wheelbase, wide handlebars and narrow tires make the Breva one quick-steering bike, and even in ultra-tight hairpins I had no trouble apexing earlier to make my move on the other oh, yes you can already guess. this journo demo ride soon turned into a mini hill-climb race and the Breva can be fun as long as you don’t forget that you’re on touring-spec Bridgestone BT45’s and that twin shocks are still twin shocks.

In fast bends the Breva was not exactly sat on rails over the bumps. So handling is just pretty much level with most entry-level bikes, but not really in the league of the Monster 620 or BMW CS650. Then again, it’s a bit pointless to force wiggles out of this bike, the Breva is really into a different game. After separating from the balls-out riding group, I could take things easier, let the Breva chug along at a less frenzied pace and even enjoy the view. The seamless pull of the engine really encourages you to do so and even points out that Guzzi have indeed the longest track record with EFI. Heck, this thing pulled out from some really slow turns in the wrong gear from as low as 1500 rpm. As for top speed, no straight stretches long enough ever appeared, but at 90 mph the Breva was still pulling so my guess would be about 100-105 mph. For light to medium range touring, the Breva engine supplies a nice, smooth cruise at 80 mph, with just enough light and unobtrusive vibration to let you know there’s a V-twin pumping down there and not some hydrogen fuel cell. With its comfy seat and suspension dialed in at the stiff side of plushy, the Breva felt like it could be ridden on day-long loops without much strain. The small smoked fairing does reduce wind pressure on the torso, and the straight bar bend puts you in good balance with wind pressure up to 85mph.

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The huge front brake that could have had the word «stoppie» rather than Brembo embossed on the caliper was for me a bit of a disappointment—maybe these were not yet run-in pads or maybe hydraulic pump ratios were chosen to prevent newbies from panic-locking the wheel? Whatever the reason, the mother of all stoppies was not to be, and I ended up using the excellent rear more than usual. Only one other complaint: Although gear shifting is now really effortless, a missed gear was picked up every now and then. More precision please.

Guzzi’s intentions with the Breva become even clearer upon looking at the «loaded» version of the bike that was on show. A hard luggage kit hints at touring duties and no less important, there is a «lady’s saddle» option which lowers saddle height by a useful 1.5 inches. Hats off for giving the height-challenged—male or female—some consideration. And just like the way the California 1100 was the unexpected winner in many a cruiser comparo, the Breva might yet turn out to be one of the better deals out there for entry level road riders. In Italy it’s going to undercut the Monster 620/BMW 650 price by a few hundred Euros, and it’s a much more lavishly finished and equipped machine than the way-cheaper Japanese 500 twins—a classic case of business school strategies put to good use in identifying a market niche, married to good classic looks. The Breva is not going to make anybody’s blood boil, it’s too refined and elegant for that, but as a groovy machine that you’d be happy to send your young sister/brother/wife on for their first ride, it’s hard to fault.

MOTO GUZZI Breva 750 i.e.

La cura ricostituente attuata da Ivano Beggio e dai suoi collaboratori, si era già da tempo notata su tutta la gamma dei modelli Moto Guzzi, con miglioramenti sia tecnici che estetici, ma una moto completamente nuova e pensata ad hoc non si era ancora vista.

Ebbene, la Breva 750 rappresenta la primogenita di una nuova stirpe, ed il nome stesso, preso in prestito da un vento che soffia sul lago di Como e che ha la caratteristica di spazzare via le nuvole, si adatta perfettamente a questa moto.
La Breva è stata pensata come moto del «rilancio», dopo il risanamento dei conti raggiunto con il pareggio del bilancio nell’anno 2002 (nel 2000 la Moto Guzzi perdeva 10 milioni di Euro), è arrivato il momento degli utili e questa due ruote è stata pensata con questo scopo.

La linea, nel complesso, è moderna e piacevole, niente di azzardato o di troppo «avanti». Azzeccato il design del serbatoio ben sagomato e moderno con i suoi tagli spigolosi, come piacevole risulta il parafango posteriore.
Meno accattivanti il cupolino e gli scarichi (troppo cromati per una moto in cui regna il satinato) che però non intaccano il giudizio positivo sul design della Breva.

Strumentazione analogica ben leggibile dal look classico, con la chicca del pulsante dell’hazard (le quattro frecce) posizionato al centro del cruscotto.

Decisamente buone le finiture, sia per quanto riguarda il motore e le fusioni, sia per la verniciatura.

A proposito del motore, la Breva monta il classico bicilindrico a V di 90° rivisto in modo «pesante», al fine di renderlo affidabile, trattabile, silenzioso e soprattutto pulito (con l’aiuto di un catalizzatore trivalente con sonda lambda, il bicilindrico Guzzi è in regola con le norme Euro 2).

Esteticamente l’unica cosa che balza all’occhio sono i nuovi coperchi delle punterie, mentre al suo «interno» le novità sono numerose, come i pistoni, gli alberi a camme e l’impianto di lubrificazione riprogettati, mentre l’adozione di un impianto di alimentazione ad iniezione elettronica Weber Marelli con corpi farfallati da 36mm regala un nuovo carattere ai 744 cc della Breva.

Tutto questo per una potenza dichiarata di 48 cv a 6.800 giri ed una coppia di 54,7 Nm a 3.600 giri.

Anche il cambio ha subito vari «trattamenti» grazie ai quali ha finalmente trovato precisione e affidabilità nel funzionamento.

Tutte queste novità, sono montate all’interno di un telaio a doppia culla in tubi d’acciaio.

Il reparto sospensioni vede all’avantreno una forcella Marzocchi da 40 mm, mentre al retrotreno troviamo una coppia di ammortizzatori regolabili nel precarico (come optional sono disponibili dei Bitubo con serbatoio separato regolabili anche in estensione e compressione).

La frenata si affida ad una coppia di dischi, un 320 mm anteriore «lavorato» da una pinza Brembo a quattro pistoncini, mentre dietro troviamo un 260 mm accoppiato ad una pinza a due pistoncini.

Montati in sella, si apprezza immediatamente l’impostazione di guida, con una posizione che permette di avere tutto sotto controllo e con i piedi ben piantati a terra (anche per i meno dotati. in altezza). Acceso, il bicilindrico dimostra che la cura dei tecnici ha dato i suoi frutti.

Estremamente silenzioso, il motore gira rotondo, senza incertezze. Inserita la prima e di seguito tutte le altre marce, ci arriva la conferma che anche il lavoro effettuato sul cambio ha dato i suoi frutti. Certo la corsa della leva non è delle più brevi, ma la manovrabilità segna un netto miglioramento con proverbiale scomparsa di impuntamenti e sfollate.

Estremamente facile, la guida della Breva è adatta sia al neofita o alle ragazze che vogliono provare una moto «vera» (per loro c’è anche una sella dedicata abbassata di tre cm) sia all’utente un filo più smaliziato, che troverà nelle caratteristiche di guida di questa Guzzi delle piacevoli sorprese.

Il motore non disdegna la zona alta del contagiri (il limitatore è fissato intorno agli 8.000), ma dà il meglio di se nell’intervallo tra i 4.000 ed i 6.000 giri dove mette in mostra una fluidità di funzionamento da riferimento. Nella guida rilassata il V2 si dimostra capace di riprendere anche dai regimi più bassi senza il benchè minimo indugio a dimostrazione della bontà di erogazione.

48 cv non sono molti, ma come spesso accade nei bicilindrici, sono cavalli veri. Così la Breva, anche considerando la sua destinazione, difficilmente si trova in debito di potenza.

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L’utilizzo consigliato è quello cittadino ed extraurbano, ma se equipaggiamo la Breva con le borse rigide optional, e considerando l’ottima accoglienza riservata al passeggero, questa moto si può tranquillamente utilizzare come moto da turismo.

Non aspettatevi grandi cose dal cupolino (ma è già pronta la versione maggiorata), per il resto il comfort risulta elevato, con una frizione tutt’altro che affaticante, sospensioni soft (ma non cedevoli) sella comoda e poche vibrazioni.

Aprendo in modo più disinvolto il gas, la Breva reagisce positivamente, aumentando il ritmo cioè, la moto non si scompone più di tanto. Solo la coppia di ammortizzatori posteriori fatica a incassare le sconnessioni più «secche», ma senza scompensare in modo eccessivo l’assetto della moto.

L’agilità, conferita dalla gommatura snella, 110/70 ant. e 130/80 post. ha come rovescio della medaglia una leggera caduta di appeal soprattutto per quanto riguarda la vista posteriore, nella quale il pneumatico si «perde». non si può avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca.

I freni svolgono il loro compito egregiamente, anche se le leve vanno «strizzate» per bene, al fine di ottenere delle decelerazioni incisive. Anche se maltrattati, difficilmente perdono mordente, risultando sempre pronti.

Il prezzo di questa Guzzi è di 7.600 Euro, una somma che la mette in concorrenza con le migliori moto della categoria, ma non per questo deve avere timore reverenziale, anche perché quell’aquila sul serbatoio conferisce grande personalità alla Breva, cosa che non tutte le moto possono vantare.

2003 Moto Guzzi Breva V 750 IE

It is no coincidence that it bears the name of a wind which blows away the clouds and is a synonym for fine weather. The design is modern, captivating from the first glance, but unmistakably a Moto Guzzi. Accurately designed and finished, it stands out for the soft lines of the anatomical tank, the touch of class given by the three-spoke wheels and the mettle of the sub-fairing pillar. And it’s more than just skin deep.

Breva 750 is easy and instinctive to ride, inspiring immediate confidence in the rider. Its compact size, ergonomic riding position and easy handling are all precious characteristics in city traffic, but the Breva 750 is also fun to ride on mixed roads, solo or with a passenger.

Merit of the short wheelbase and mechanics, with the highly effective double cradle frame in high tensile steel and steering geometry designed to facilitate entry into bends and rapid direction changes. Riding pleasure is enhanced by the electronic injection, providing smooth progressive power and constant efficiency.

The engine is environmentally friendly, adopting a more efficient catalytic converter with a higher concentration of noble metals, in compliance with Euro3 and CARB standards. The colors and graphics are also new (Corsa Red and Guzzi Black), for a model also appreciated by female riders, for whom there is an optional low seat, just one in a rich range of accessories designed to make your Moto Guzzi even more personal.

The name of the small of house Guzzi Motion indicates the name of a lariano wind that sweeps clouds and is synonymous of beautiful time. Contemporary, winning since the first look, but unmistakably Guzzi Motion, Breva 750 makes itself to admire for the soft lines of the anatomical tank, for the touch of class of the circles to three razze, for the grinta of aims them sottocarena. Easy to guide and instinctive, he gives confidenza quickly to who knows them in saddleback thanks to the compact dimensions, the corrected position of guide and the great ease of handling, he renders than it agile in the city and funny traffic to lead on the mixed distances, to face by themselves or in brace. The merit is from subdividing to interasse the content, that it facilitates the income in curve and the changes of direction repentini, and to the solidity of the chassis to double crib, in high-tensile steel, than determined a great precision of guide assisted from the ready and fluid answer of the propeller fed to injection electronic. The intrinsic facility and the contagious sympathy of its line, render it loved also from the feminine public, for which it has been dedicated the saddleback lowered in option, that it enriches the nourished range of accessories dedicated to Breva 750. The liveries rispecchiano the two spirits of the motion, with traditional the Black Run Guzzi and Rosso to place side by side the glares trendy of bicolored black/silver.

Мотоцикл Breva V750 ie (2003): технические характеристики, фото, видео

2003 Moto Guzzi Breva V 750 IE

The guys from Mandello need a new type of buyer indeed. Dunno if you’ve noticed, but it’s already a few years that Moto-Guzzi’s offerings are centered around customs and cruisers/tourers. As lovely as those V11’s are, it’s the California 1100’s and Nevada 750’s that have been keeping Guzzi afloat. Alas, since the Aprilia takeover, Guzzi are starting to see black ink again in the balance sheets, and so time for a new effort in a different direction. Accordingly, the new 750 carries a symbolic name, Breva, which is the name of the wind that blows in spring over the Lago di Como, bringing in good weather.

Before swinging even half a leg over the Breva, my first reaction was like yeah, nice indeed. Extra tasty curves and details give the Breva a very up-to-date look that’s on the other hand quite classical too. The nod towards the classic scene is evident in the choice of metallic colors. It’s not hard to see that the efforts of the staff at Marabese Design–the studio that handled the styling–headed in a very different direction than the creators of the BMW CS650.

With its visually singular engine in full view and an erect riding position, the Breva is a true roadster, a do-it-all kind of ride with a pinch of sporty stance. Good to see that under the scrutinizing eyes of the design-conscious Aprilia management, no skimping or half measures were taken on details. Plenty of sculpted cast alloy brackets, a small smoked screen and Brembo Gold series brakes give the Breva an air of quality not usually found in entry-level bikes.

If that engine looks familiar it’s because as “new” as the Breva is, its engine is still based on the “small block” Guzzi twin from the late 70’s V50’s. It has received an ultra-serious revamp since its last incarnation as the power unit for the 750 Nevada, complete with full digital management of its new injection and ignition systems. A lambda probe gas sensor supplies real time feedback to the engine management for constant low emissions adjustment, and what’s left passes through catalytic converters. Guzzi’s engineers sought drivability from this engine, which explains how a 750 can be called a beginner’s tool. Claimed power is only 48 hp, which doesn’t make much sense until you understand that many European countries limit beginners to 50 hp until they’re 21 years old. It then makes more sense to fatten the torque curve rather than shoot for peak figures. In any case, the 750 Breva falls in line power-wise with the above mentioned models, only it supplies its torque peak at a meager 3600 rpm–something a high-revving 500 dohc twin can only dream of.

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On the cycle side of things, the Breva is again, a mix of old and new. Frame seems familiar but attached to it are very nice pieces, stuff I would’ve killed for when I was a starving student with a Guzzi V50 III rat-bike held together with duct tape. Nice forks and a hefty single front disk, light looking cast wheels, braided brake hose, and yes! No linked brakes thank God! But then, I could have been even happier without those twin shocks. They’re simpler and more economical to be sure, but my back could be in better shape today if it wasn’t for those twin nasty Marzocchis of my old V50 (the Breva wears Bitubos).

Start the Breva and it settles immediately into that typical Guzzi rock and roll–shocking if you’re coming from an oriental ride but nothing special compared to a Beemer or a Sporty. The EFI and Lamabada thing have the engine pumping steady right from the word go, and a few twists of the throttle reveal a response that’s really quick and requires zero effort–no more heavy-sprung carb slides to lift here. Amazingly, clutch-pull effort has been reduced to made-in-Japan levels, no mean feat for a single-disc auto type clutch. The smooth and easy operation theme continues with sweet-shifting gears.

As it would turn out, this bike is all about sweetness and friendliness. After a few minutes of riding towards the mountains in front of Mandello del Lario shore with quite heavy traffic around, the Breva conveys a feeling of total ease of operation. It starts with a textbook standard riding position and very light and intuitive steering. Then, with peak torque coming on so early, the Breva shoots forward nicely with short throttle bursts. Just as well, the engine soon shows that although it’ll climb to almost 7K when given time, there isn’t too much point in taking it past 5.5K rpm. Trying to keep pace with the quick local Guzzi road testers that accompanied us journos for the ride, it soon become obvious that on this twisty mountain road the best trait of the Breva was its agility. A short wheelbase, wide handlebars and narrow tires make the Breva one quick-steering bike, and even in ultra-tight hairpins I had no trouble apexing earlier to make my move on the other oh, yes you can already guess. this journo demo ride soon turned into a mini hill-climb race and the Breva can be fun as long as you don’t forget that you’re on touring-spec Bridgestone BT45’s and that twin shocks are still twin shocks.

In fast bends the Breva was not exactly sat on rails over the bumps. So handling is just pretty much level with most entry-level bikes, but not really in the league of the Monster 620 or BMW CS650. Then again, it’s a bit pointless to force wiggles out of this bike, the Breva is really into a different game. After separating from the balls-out riding group, I could take things easier, let the Breva chug along at a less frenzied pace and even enjoy the view. The seamless pull of the engine really encourages you to do so and even points out that Guzzi have indeed the longest track record with EFI. Heck, this thing pulled out from some really slow turns in the wrong gear from as low as 1500 rpm. As for top speed, no straight stretches long enough ever appeared, but at 90 mph the Breva was still pulling so my guess would be about 100-105 mph. For light to medium range touring, the Breva engine supplies a nice, smooth cruise at 80 mph, with just enough light and unobtrusive vibration to let you know there’s a V-twin pumping down there and not some hydrogen fuel cell. With its comfy seat and suspension dialed in at the stiff side of plushy, the Breva felt like it could be ridden on day-long loops without much strain. The small smoked fairing does reduce wind pressure on the torso, and the straight bar bend puts you in good balance with wind pressure up to 85mph.

The huge front brake that could have had the word “stoppie” rather than Brembo embossed on the caliper was for me a bit of a disappointment–maybe these were not yet run-in pads or maybe hydraulic pump ratios were chosen to prevent newbies from panic-locking the wheel? Whatever the reason, the mother of all stoppies was not to be, and I ended up using the excellent rear more than usual. Only one other complaint: Although gear shifting is now really effortless, a missed gear was picked up every now and then. More precision please.

Guzzi’s intentions with the Breva become even clearer upon looking at the “loaded” version of the bike that was on show. A hard luggage kit hints at touring duties and no less important, there is a “lady’s saddle” option which lowers saddle height by a useful 1.5 inches. Hats off for giving the height-challenged–male or female–some consideration. And just like the way the California 1100 was the unexpected winner in many a cruiser comparo, the Breva might yet turn out to be one of the better deals out there for entry level road riders. In Italy it’s going to undercut the Monster 620/BMW 650 price by a few hundred Euros, and it’s a much more lavishly finished and equipped machine than the way-cheaper Japanese 500 twins–a classic case of business school strategies put to good use in identifying a market niche, married to good classic looks. The Breva is not going to make anybody’s blood boil, it’s too refined and elegant for that, but as a groovy machine that you’d be happy to send your young sister/brother/wife on for their first ride, it’s hard to fault.

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